FODMAP DIET

Fermentable

Oligo-saccharides

Di- accharides

Mono-saccharides

And

Polyols

 

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A diet low in FODMAP’s may be of benefit to some IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) sufferers as it removes or alleviates symptoms of bloating, wind, abdominal pain with alternating bowel habits between constipation and diarrhoea with or without nausea and vomiting, but not all! Neither will it remove other physiological symptoms such as skin conditions, joint pain and discomfort, headaches or migraines.

A diet high, FODMAP’s (fruits, dairy, vegetables and grain cereals) are a category of carbohydrates, which rapidly fermented in the gut/ intestine.

It is important when speaking with your GP that you ask to be referred to a registered dietician with FODMAP approach training.

The low FODMAP diet is complex and so it is advisable to speak with a dietician, and one who is registered and experienced with this specialist diet. This is important as it is all to easy to begin a diet but omit certain foods which subsequently will also mean that either we do not benefit fully or we miss out on essential vitamins and minerals, this can have a detrimental affect on our body through lack of nutrition. Without the appropriate knowledge of foods, ingredients, processed foods, labels and eating out we can easily read information wrongly as some ingredients are ‘hidden’ being called different names like E numbers. There is a lot of confusing advice, some research has become outdated, then there is new research, and it is all too easy to read information on the internet to follow it to our detriment or even peril. It can also become ineffective.

The FODMAP diet is relatively new, so it is possible that a GP or gastroenterologist does not know if this diet, ask for them to refer you to a registered dietician to receive the correct up-to-date information. There are FODMAP trained dieticians working in the NHS and privately both may require referrals from your GP or consultant private dieticians may also require a referral. A vast amount of research and training is being undertaken a growing number of registered dieticians who are skilled in the delivery of the low FODMAP diet with formal training at a variety of global institutions.

High FODMAP

Vegetables and Legumes

  • Garlic – avoid entirely if possible
  • Onions – avoid entirely if possible
  • Artichoke
  • Asparagus
  • Baked beans
  • Beetroot
  • Black eyed peas
  • Broad beans
  • Butter beans
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery – greater than 5cm of stalk
  • Kidney beans
  • Leeks
  • Mange Tout
  • Mushrooms
  • Peas
  • Savoy Cabbage
  • Soy beans
  • Split peas
  • Scallions / spring onions (bulb / white part)
  • Shallots

Fruit – fruits can contain high fructose

  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Avocado
  • Blackberries
  • Cherries
  • Currants
  • Dates
  • Feijoa
  • Figs
  • Grapefruit
  • Lychee
  • Mango
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Persimmon
  • Plums
  • Pomegranate
  • Prunes
  • Raisins
  • Tinned fruit in apple / pear juice
  • Watermelon

Meats, Poultry and Meat Substitutes

  • Chorizo
  • Sausages
  • Processed meat – check ingredients

Cereals, Grains, Breads, Biscuits, Pasta, Nuts and Cakes

  • Wheat containing products such (be sure to check labels):
  • Biscuits
  • Breadcrumbs
  • Cashews
  • Cakes
  • Croissants
  • Crumpets
  • Egg noodles
  • Muffins
  • Regular noodles
  • Pastries
  • Pasta made from wheat
  • Sourdough
  • Udon noodles
  • Wheat bread
  • Wheat cereals
  • Wheat flour
  • Wheat rolls
  • Wheatgerm
  • Barley
  • Bran cereals
  • Couscous
  • Gnocchi
  • Muesli
  • Pistachios
  • Rye
  • Semolina

Condiments, Sweets, Sweeteners and Spreads

  • Agavae
  • Fructose
  • Gravy, if it contains onion
  • High fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
  • Honey
  • Milk chocolate
  • Relish
  • Stock cubes
  • Sugar free sweets containing polyols – usually ending in -ol or isomalt
  • Inulin
  • Isomalt
  • Maltitol
  • Mannitol
  • Sorbitol
  • Xylitol

Prebiotic Foods

  • The follow items can be added to yoghurts, snack bars etc:
  • FOS – fructooligosaccharides
  • Inulin
  • Oligofructose

Drinks

  • Beer – if drinking more than one bottle
  • Dandelion tea
  • Fruit and herbal teas with apple added
  • Fruit juices in large quantities
  • Fruit juices made of apple, pear, mango
  • Orange juice in quantities over 100ml
  • Rum
  • Sodas containing High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
  • Soy milk made with soy beans – commonly found in USA
  • Sports drinks
  • Tea, fennel
  • Tea, chamomile
  • Tea, oolong
  • Wine – if drinking more than one glass

Dairy Foods

  • Buttermilk
  • Cream cheese
  • Cream
  • Custard
  • Ice cream
  • Milk – cow, goat and sheep
  • Sour cream
  • Yoghurt – including greek yogurt

LOW FODMAP

egetables and Legumes

  • Alfalfa
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Bok choy / pak choi
  • Broccoli – avoid large servings
  • Brussel sprouts – 1 serving of 2 sprouts
  • Butternut squash – 1/4 cup
  • Cabbage – 1 serving of 1 cup
  • Carrots
  • Celery – less than 5cm of stalk
  • Collard greens
  • Corn / sweet corn- if tolerable and only in small amounts – 1/2 cob
  • Courgette
  • Chick peas – 1/4 cup
  • Chilli – if tolerable
  • Chives
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant / aubergine
  • Fennel
  • Green beans
  • Green pepper (green bell pepper)
  • Ginger
  • Kale
  • Leek leaves
  • Lentils – in small amounts
  • Lettuce
  • Marrow
  • Okra
  • Olives
  • Parsnip
  • Radish
  • Red peppers (red bell pepper)
  • Potato
  • Pumpkin
  • Pumpkin, canned – 1/4 cup, 2.2 oz
  • Scallions / spring onions (green part)
  • Silverbeet / chard
  • Spaghetti squash
  • Spinach, baby
  • Squash
  • Swede
  • Sweet potato – 1/2 cup
  • Tomato – avoid cherry tomato
  • Turnip
  • Yam
  • Zucchini

Fruit

  • Bananas
  • Blueberries
  • Boysenberry
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cranberry
  • Clementine
  • Dragonfruit
  • Grapes
  • Honeydew and Galia melons
  • Kiwifruit
  • Lemon including lemon juice
  • Lime
  • Mandarin
  • Orange
  • Passion fruit
  • Paw paw
  • Papaya
  • Pineapple
  • Raspberry
  • Rhubarb
  • Strawberry
  • Tangelo

Meats, Poultry and Meat Substitutes

  • Chicken
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Prosciutto
  • Quorn, mince
  • Turkey
  • Cold cuts / deli meat / cold meats such as ham and turkey breast

Fish and Seafood

  • Canned tuna
  • Fresh fish e.g.
    • Salmon
    • Cod
    • Haddock
    • Plaice
    • Trout
  • Seafood (ensuring nothing else is added) e.g.
    • Crab
    • Lobster
    • Shrimp
    • Mussels
    • Oysters

Cereals, Grains, Breads, Biscuits, Pasta, Nuts and Cakes

  • Wheat free or gluten free breads
  • Bread made from oats, rice, corn, and potato flours
  • Wheat free or gluten free pasta
  • Buckwheat noodles
  • Rice noodles
  • Porridge and oat based cereals
  • Cornflakes – 1/2 cup
  • Rice bran
  • Rice Krispies
  • Almonds – max of 15
  • Amaranth
  • Brazil nuts
  • Bulgur / bourghal – 1/4 cup cooked, 44g serving
  • Buckwheat
  • Buckwheat flour
  • Brown rice / whole grain rice
  • Cornflour / maize
  • Crispbread
  • Corncakes
  • Coconut – milk, cream, flesh
  • Corn tortillas, 3 tortillas
  • Hazelnuts – max of 15
  • Macadamia – max of 10
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Oatcakes
  • Peanuts
  • Pecans – max of 15
  • Pine nuts – max of 15
  • Polenta
  • Popcorn
  • Potato chips, plain
  • Potato flour
  • Pumpkin seeds – max of 1 – 2 tbsp
  • Quinoa
  • Rice cakes
  • Rice crackers
  • Rice flour
  • Sesame seeds – max of 1 – 2 tbsp
  • Spelt
  • Sunflower seeds – max of 1 – 2 tbsp
  • Sorgum
  • Tortilla chips
  • Walnuts – max of 10
  • White rice

Condiments, Sweets, Sweeteners and Spreads

  • Aspartame
  • Acesulfame K
  • Barbecue sauce
  • Chocolate, dark
  • Chutney, 1 tablespoon
  • Fish sauce
  • Garlic infused oil
  • Golden syrup
  • Glucose
  • Jam / jelly, strawberry
  • Ketchup (USA) – 1 sachet
  • Maple syrup
  • Marmalade
  • Mayonnaise – ensuring no garlic or onion in ingredients
  • Mustard
  • Olive oil
  • Oyster sauce
  • Pesto sauce – less than 1 tbsp
  • Peanut butter
  • Saccharine
  • Soy sauce
  • Stevia
  • Sweet and sour sauce
  • Sucralose
  • Sugar – also called sucrose
  • Tomato sauce (outside USA) – 2 sachets, 13g
  • Vegemite
  • Vinegar, balsamic – less than 2 tbsp
  • Vinegar, rice wine
  • Worcestershire sauce

Drinks

  • Alcohol – is an irritant to the gut, limited intake advised:
  • Beer – limited to one drink
  • Clear spirits such as Vodka
  • Gin
  • Whiskey
  • Wine – limited to one drink
  • Coffee, espresso, regular or decaffeinated, black
  • Coffee, espresso, regular or decaffeinated, with up to 250ml lactose free milk
  • Coffee, instant, regular or decaffeinated, black
  • Coffee, instant, regular or decaffeinated, with up to 250ml lactose free milk
  • Espresso, regular, black
  • Fruit juice, 125ml and safe fruits only
  • Lemonade – in low quantities
  • Soya milk made with soy protein
  • Sugar free fizzy drinks / soft drinks / soda – such as diet coke, in low quantities as aspartame and acesulfame k can be irritants
  • ‘Sugar’ fizzy drinks / soft drinks / soda that do no contain HFCS such as lemonade, cola. Limit intake due to these drinks being generally unhealthy and can cause gut irritation
  • Tea, black, weak e.g. PG Tips
  • Tea, chai, weak
  • Tea, fruit and herbal, weak – ensure no apple added
  • Tea, green
  • Tea, peppermint
  • Tea, white
  • Water

Dairy Foods and Eggs

  • Butter
  • Cheese, brie
  • Cheese, camembert
  • Cheese, cheddar
  • Cheese, cottage
  • Cheese, feta
  • Cheese, goat / chevre
  • Cheese, mozzarella
  • Cheese, ricotta – 2 tablespoons
  • Cheese, swiss
  • Dairy free chocolate pudding
  • Eggs
  • Gelato
  • Lactose free milk
  • Lactose free yoghurt
  • Margarine
  • Oat milk
  • Parmesan cheese
  • Rice milk
  • Sorbet
  • Soy protein (avoid soya beans)
  • Swiss cheese
  • Tempeh
  • Tofu
  • Whipped cream

Cooking ingredients, Herbs and Spices

  • Herbs: Basil, Cilantro, Coriander, Mint, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Tarragon, Thyme
  • Spices: All spice, Cinnamon, Cumin, Five spice, Paprika, Turmeric
  • Baking powder
  • Baking soda
  • Cocoa powder
  • Cream, 1/2 cup
  • Gelatine
  • Ghee
  • Icing sugar
  • Lard
  • Salt
  • Vegetable oil

Training and good nutrition work best together!

Drink for the reason that around 70% of your body is made up of water; used to regulate temperature, lubricate joints and transport nutrients and energy around the body. Dehydration diminishes performance, so when you are training, you will sweat more, add an electrolyte tablet to your drink.

Avoid spikes in blood sugar from high G.I. sugary processed food and snacks eat low G.I carbohydrates which stabilise blood sugar and last for longer in the body.

Avoid overuse of caffeine which interferes with performance

Foods high in saturated fats should be avoided, but your body needs essential fats to process protein, and in endurance events, the body uses fat as fuel. Fish, nuts and avocado are sources of good fats. Supplement your diet with fish oil supplements which contain Omega 3 and Omega 6 will provide added benefits to joints, reducing inflammation, and boosting energy!

To quickly replenish glycogen stores and muscle repair, which continues after exercise for a few hours, eat something small every hour since small meals are easier for the body to process than one large meal.

Training and good nutrition work best together!

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How to you flavour and sweetness to cooking while also using less sugar

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NHS guidelines, added sugars should not make up more than 10% of the energy or calorie intake you obtain from food and drink everyday. Which is approximately 70g for men and 50g for women.

Six types of sugar:

• Glucose: Simple sugar that can be carried in the blood. One half of sucrose or table sugar

• Fructose: Simple sugar that occurs naturally in fruit. The other half of sucrose

• Sucrose: Table sugar it is refined and occurs naturally in sugar cane or beets

• Lactose: Milk sugar, which makes up just less than 5% of cow’s milk

• Maltose: Two joined-up glucose molecules
• High fructose corn syrup: Where half of the syrup’s glucose has been converted into fructose. Chemically very similar to sucrose.

Coconut palm sugar is produced from the sap of the coconut palm’s flower buds, coconut palm sugar has a glycaemic index rating of 35; notably lower than refined sugar. Coconut palm sugar is therefore a perfect substitute in cooking as the affect on your blood sugars is less dangerous. Also, it is more nutritious containing; amino acids, potassium, magnesium, zinc, iron and B vitamins. Conveniently it can be used in the same ration as refined table sugar in recipes.

Fruit contains a simple sugar called fructose along with fibre, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Increase fibre intake, by replacing table sugar with chopped or pureed fruit to sweeten yoghurt, cakes like in a banana bread recipe or mashed bananas in flapjack instead of sugar and golden syrup, (the negative is a shorter shelf life) some food may be frozen. Fruit peel is also full of antioxidants and can be grated into smoothies or used to tenderise meat. Add chopped apples making muesli. Humans are not meant to consume as much sugar as we do only a limited amount in proportion to our calorie intake in a varied balanced diet, such as fructose which is naturally occurring sugar in fruit.
The NHS recommends eating five portions of fruit and vegetables per day, each weighing 80g of different colours to benefit from the different vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

Agave nectar is a sweetener from several species of the agave plant in Mexico consists of glucose and fructose. It is about 1.5 times sweeter than table sugar and has a similar consistency to honey.
It is used as an alternative to sugar as it has a much lower glycemic index than that of sucrose. It is used as a vegan alternative to honey as it is a plant.
The ratio of fructose to glucose is roughly 70% fructose to 30% glucose, whereas sucrose is 50% fructose to 50% glucose. However, there is no proof that refined agave syrups are healthier than refined sugar as they still contain the same number of calories per serving.

strong>Honey is a naturally sweet liquid (made from the nectar of flowers and collected by honey bees), 80% natural sugars, 18% water and 2% minerals, vitamins, pollen and protein. Fructose and glucose make up 70% of honey’s natural sugar content, the balance determines if honey is cloudy or clear. It is higher in nutrients than processed white sugar. A 100g of caster sugar provides 400kcals of energy, 100g of carbohydrates, equivalent amount of pure clear honey provides on average, 330kcals of energy, 81g of carbohydrate so they are relatively similar. It has benefits antibacterial properties also it has been used as a natural remedy for over 5000 years.
In cooking, replace sugar with honey, use it to add sweetness and flavour to food and drink. In baking cakes it attracts water so keeps cakes moist for longer.

Stevia is a natural sweetener made from the leaves of the stevia plant (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni), which is native to Paraguay, and mostly grown there and in Brazil.
Steviol glycosides are high intensity sweeteners, 250-300 times sweeter than sucrose, and comes in liquid or powder form.
It has no calories, contains no sugar or carbohydrates and boasts a glycemic index of 0, making it attractive to dieters.
Stevia comes from the stevia plant and has been added to Sprite lemonade by Coca-Cola to lower calories by 30%.
Previously, stevia was mainly known among industry insiders, but since knowledge has been shared it is now an attractive sweetener, as such there is an accelerated growth in use of the ingredient. There was a global increase in stevia used in food production. The EU passed a law, in 2011, allowing stevia to be used in food and drink.

Dextrose
is manufactured from corn, it is a form of glucose, a monosaccharide, which is a “simple” sugar. It is, according to the Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the traditional name in pharmacy for d‐glucose “the dextrorotatory component of invert sugar”. It can be bought in liquid or powder form, it is gaining in use as a sugar substitute as it is considered by some to be the “good” part of sugar, the glucose, for athletes or those who have been ill. Athletes may use powdered dextrose after exercise to boost energy levels in muscle – as it quickly raises blood glucose levels, as it has a high glycemic index rating of 100.
Other sweet foods can also quickly raise blood glucose levels, however, they can contain sucrose, a combination of glucose and fructose. Fructose does not convert into glycogen in your muscles, which is why athletes prefer to use dextrose.

Xylitol originates from wood but is or was used in food and drinks as a sugar alternative? Personally, I find this concerning and as I suffer from food allergies/intolerances and IBS.
Xyl” is the Greek for wood.
Xylitol was first made from Finnish birch trees in the early 1900s.
However, it is also naturally produced by most living things including trees, fruits, plants, animals and even people, as xylitol being the alcohol form of xylose.
Xylitol is used as a sweetener, it has 40% fewer calories than sugar, 75% less carbohydrates, a low GI (of 7), and believed to inhibit the bacteria in the mouth that causes tooth decay but tastes similar to sugar. It is now used in mints, gum, children’s sweets, and certified by the British Dental Health Foundation.
There are many recipes out on how to cook with it to reduce sugar in the diet.
However, there are also concerns as it can affect people with intestinal or bowel problems.

Tru3 J0y

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Fabulously healthy (ad-lib) Flapjack!

Ingredients and method

You will need:
18″x23″ rectangular tray tin or similar swiss roll tin greased and lined with greaseproof paper
large bowl
wooden spoon
oven
small bowl if microwaving the sugars and butter/oil mixture or saucepan if not

100 grams/ 4 ounces of sugar of your choice: Muscovado Sugar (for chewy texture) or golden granulated sugar (crunchy texture), soft brown sugar ( for a slightly chewy texture)
100 grams/ 4 ounces of Butter or 100 fluid ounces of sunflower oil
2 Large tablespoons or 4 large dessert spoons of golden syrup
Place these into a saucepan heat until combined stirring with a wooden spoon or in a bowl and microwave for one minute stir, remove spoon, then another 30 seconds remove, stir, remove spoon until combined. However I find heating in a saucepan the best way but it works either way and you will still obtain good results.
Place 100 grams of oats (large or small) into a bowl more if too wet a mixture add more oats however add any optional additions first, mix well.
Turn out into lined baking tray bake for 25-30 minutes 180 (170 fan ovens) or gas mark 4.

Optional extra additions to make it more enjoyable

50 grams or 2 ounces of Dried fruits (if adding) such as raisins, chopped dates, cherries, cranberries berries, as preferred one or more

Or
50 grams of nuts preferred such as pecan walnut, macademia, hazelnut, Brazil roughly chopped but not too small

Or be inventive…

Variations…

Your favourite fruit and nuts

For a scrumptious but naughty treat triple chocolate chunks or once cooled melted chocolate on top

Instead of golden syrup use maple syrup and 50 grams of pecan nuts roughly chopped and you have pecan pie flapjacks


Or
Raspberries and white chocolate

Or
Macademias, Cherries or cranberries and white or dark chocolate

Or just be naughty and have triple chocolate chunks in them or once cooled pour melted chocolate over the top cut once cooled and set.

Enjoy! Bon Appetite!

I will aim to add photographs of my latest version if not eaten yet!

Ad-lib ~ Scrummy Yummy Banana cake

I am a cook who likes (occasionally) to ad lib with my cooking as we recently moved this has become fairly regular which in meals such as curries and variations of mixed grill style lunch or supper it does not matter so much. However I have recently ad-libbed on my ‘Banana cake’ twice each for the gluten and dairy free version and for the normal version.


1st Ad-lib Gluten and Dairy free Banana cake

Ingredients
2 ripe peeled bananas
1 egg
100grams 4 ounces oats
100grams 4 ounces sugar
100grams 4 ounces spread or sunflower oil
100grams 4 ounces gluten free bread flour
1 teaspoon Baking soda
1 teaspoon Vanilla essence
1 tablespoon Golden syrup
100 ml milk dairy free

Method
Line a deep 8″ cake tin square or round with greaseproof paper.
Turn the oven on to 180 for an electric fan oven, gas mark 5 or 190 for an electric oven without a fan.
Place the egg, banana, sugar, syrup, spread/oil, oats, vanilla essence, into a large bowl which thoroughly with an electric whisk until the banana is blended into the mixture and no lumps are left.
Take out the whisk.
Put in the flour and baking soda using a metal spoon fold in the mixture slowly and gently adding the milk gradually.
Gently scoop or pour out the mixture into the lined cake tin and smooth and flatten the surface.
Place into the oven baking for one hour checking with a cake skewer or similar slim implement to check if cooked.
N.B. If not leave in the oven for five or ten minutes depending on how moist and sticky the mixture still is ~ longer if stickier less if not too sticky on the skewer.

Enjoy hot with butter as this is more of a bread style cake with the bread flour!
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1st Ad-lib Banana cake

Ingredients
2 ripe bananas
1 egg
100grams 4 ounces oats
100grams 4 ounces sugar
100grams 4 ounces spread or sunflower oil
100grams 4 ounces wholemeal bread flour
1 teaspoon Baking soda
1 teaspoon Vanilla essence
1 tablespoon Golden syrup
100 ml milk

Method
Line a deep 8″ cake tin square or round with greaseproof paper.
Turn the oven on to 180 for an electric fan oven, gas mark 5 or 190 for an electric oven without a fan.
Place the egg, banana, sugar, syrup, spread/oil, oats, vanilla essence, into a large bowl which thoroughly with an electric whisk until the banana is blended into the mixture and no lumps are left.
Take out the whisk.
Put in the flour and baking soda using a metal spoon fold in the mixture slowly and gently adding the milk gradually.
Gently scoop or pour out the mixture into the lined cake tin and smooth and flatten the surface.
Place into the oven baking for one hour checking with a cake skewer or similar slim implement to check if cooked.

N.B. If not leave in the oven for five or ten minutes depending on how moist and sticky the mixture still is ~ longer if stickier less if not too sticky on the skewer.

Enjoy hot with butter as this is more of a bread style cake with the bread flour!
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2nd Ad-lib Gluten and Dairy free Banana cake

Ingredients
2 ripe peeled bananas
3 small eggs
100grams 4 ounces oats
100grams 4 ounces sugar
100grams 4 ounces spread or sunflower oil
100grams 4 ounces gluten free bread flour
1 teaspoon Baking soda
1 teaspoon Vanilla essence
1 Large tablespoon of Golden syrup
a light sprinkling of cinnamon, ginger and mixed spice

Method
Line a deep 8″ cake tin square or round with greaseproof paper.
Turn the oven on to 180 for an electric fan oven, gas mark 5 or 190 for an electric oven without a fan.
Place the eggs, banana, sugar, syrup, spread/oil, oats, vanilla essence, spices into a large bowl which thoroughly with an electric whisk until the banana is blended into the mixture and no lumps are left.
Take out the whisk.
Put in the flour and baking soda using a metal spoon fold in the mixture slowly and gently.
Gently scoop out the mixture into the lined cake tin and smooth and flatten the surface.
Place into the oven baking for one hour checking with a cake skewer or similar slim implement to check if cooked.

N.B. If not leave in the oven for five or ten minutes depending on how moist and sticky the mixture still is ~ longer if stickier less if not too sticky on the skewer.

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2nd Ad-lib Banana cake

Ingredients
1 1/2 ripe peeled bananas
3 small eggs
100grams 4 ounces oats
100grams 4 ounces sugar
100grams 4 ounces spread or sunflower oil
100grams 4 ounces wholemeal bread flour
1 teaspoon Baking soda
1 teaspoon Vanilla essence
a light sprinkling of cinnamon, ginger and mixed spice
1 Large tablespoon of Golden syrup

Method
Line a deep 8″ cake tin square or round with greaseproof paper.
Turn the oven on to 180 for an electric fan oven, gas mark 5 or 190 for an electric oven without a fan.
Place the eggs, banana, sugar, syrup, spread/oil, oats, vanilla essence, spices into a large bowl which thoroughly with an electric whisk until the banana is blended into the mixture and no lumps are left.
Take out the whisk.
Put in the flour and baking soda using a metal spoon fold in the mixture slowly and gently.
Gently scoop out the mixture into the lined cake tin and smooth and flatten the surface.
Place into the oven baking for one hour checking with a cake skewer or similar slim implement to check if cooked.

N.B. If not leave in the oven for five or ten minutes depending on how moist and sticky the mixture still is ~ longer if stickier less if not too sticky on the skewer.
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