Food for thought 

A few ideas for meals,  I will elaborate on later as the candles burnt long enough tonight! 

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Could your symptoms mean you’re an undiagnosed coeliac?

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Coeliac disease symptoms vary among people as a result the symptoms can range from very mild to severe. The reactions are different from an allergic reaction as symptoms do not cause anaphylactic shock. Coeliac disease is a ‘multi-system’ disorder for the reason that symptoms may affect any area of the body.

Symptoms

Symptoms of eating gluten differ among individuals which can last from a few hours to a few days whilst eating gluten so less gluten makes your symptoms vary in severity:

• Headaches,
• Diarrhoea,
• Stomach pains, cramps, bloatedness,
• Lethargy,
• Severe or occasional diarrhoea, excessive wind and/or constipation,
• Persistent or unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting,
• Recurrent stomach pain, cramping or bloating,
• Deficiency of one or a combination of iron, vitamin B12 or folic acid,
• Anaemia,
• Tiredness and/or headaches,
• Unexpected or rapid weight loss,
• Mouth ulcers,
• Alopecia (hair loss),
• Dermatitis herpetiformis (skin rash)
• Tooth enamel problems,
• Depression,
• Infertility,
• Liver abnormalities,
• Repeated miscarriages,
• Joint pain and/or bone pain,
• Neurological; nerve; ataxia which is poor muscle coordination; neuropathy numbness and tingling in the hands and feet,
• Amenorrhea which is a lack of periods in women,
• Symptoms in young children and babies may differ and require close monitoring to refer to a GP.

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Food intolerances, food allergy or adverse food reactions

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Food allergy” is sometimes used to describe all adverse reactions to food, the term is more often used to refer specifically to food reactions that are mediated by the immune system.
To protect us from illness and disease, our immune systems protect us from illnesses and diseases so are continuously trying to lessen the danger represented by substances called antigens. Antigens are parts of proteins that our bodies recognize as dangerous and take steps to neutralize. Antigens can be found most anywhere there is protein – in foods, of course, but also in microorganisms like bacteria.
When our immune cells identify a dangerous antigen, they act to neutralize it and prevent it from causing harm in the body. When antigens from bacteria or viruses interact with our cells, we can get the flu, or the common cold. We don’t get the flu from food antigens, but we can get a wide range of immune-related symptoms that range from sniffles to hives to anaphylactic shock.

Immediate versus Delayed Hypersensitivity
Allergic reactions to food, also called food hypersensitivities, are further classified as either immediate or delayed. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions occur within hours or even a few minutes after a food is eaten, typically causing very obvious physical symptoms such as a rash, the hives, a running nose, or a headache.
In rare cases, immediate hypersensitivity reactions can cause anaphylactic shock, a life-threatening condition in which the throat swells and blocks the passage of air. Immediate hypersensitivities affect only a small percentage of the population.

Immediate Reactions to Food
The foods that are most often implicated as the cause of immediate allergic responses include milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (walnuts), soy, strawberries, wheat, fish and shellfish. Many people with immediate food hypersensitivities must completely eliminate the offending food from their diet to avoid the serious symptoms.

Delayed Reactions to Food
Many of the same foods that are known to cause immediate hypersensitivities in a small number of people, have been implicated as a cause of delayed or “masked” food allergies in much larger numbers of individuals. Delayed food hypersensitivity reactions are believed to affect millions of people; some physicians have suggested that as many as 60% of all Americans suffer from masked food allergies.
These reactions may be responsible for a variety of symptoms including dark circles or puffiness under the eyes, fluid retention, dermatitis, sinus congestion, fatigue, abdominal pain or discomfort, joint inflammation, mood swings, indigestion, headaches, chronic ear infections, asthma, poor memory, anxiety and depression.
As the name suggests, delayed hypersensitivities do not appear immediately after consuming a particular food. In fact, in most cases the immune response is so delayed that it is difficult to determine which food is causing the symptoms, and many people are unaware that they are sensitive to certain foods.
Only through careful dietary manipulation, such as an Elimination Diet or Rotation Diet, is it usually possible to identify these hidden food allergies. The foods most often associated with delayed hypersensitivities include dairy products, eggs, wheat, soy products, peanuts, shellfish, and refined sugar.

Food Intolerance are immune-mediated food allergies represent one type of adverse food reaction. Another type of adverse food reaction is called food intolerance. Food intolerance is an umbrella term that refers to any abnormal physiological response to a food that is not caused by an antibody/antigen reaction. For example, some food intolerances are caused by enzyme deficiencies, while others are caused by poor function of the digestive tract or a sensitivity to a natural or synthetic chemical.

Lactose Intolerance is the most common food intolerance, which affects as many as 30% of adults, additionally it is particularly common in people of African and Asian heritage.
People with lactose intolerance do not produce enough of the digestive enzyme called lactase, which breaks down the milk sugar (lactose) found in dairy products. When too much undigested lactose makes its way into the large intestine, people suffer from gas and/or diarrhea.

Wheat intolerance, wheat allergy, and wheat sensitivity are all terms frequently used to described adverse reaction to this food. Wheat is somewhat unique when it comes to adverse food reactions, particularly because it has long been classified as the primary “gluten grain” and because its research history has been both complicated and controversial. Understanding allergy-related issues associated with gluten is important for understanding problems connected to wheat.

Banana syrup cake

Ingredients
200 grams butter or margarine for lactose intolerant use dairy free spread
200 grams sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 Tablespoon Lyles Golden syrup
1 teaspoon cinnamon
4 medium eggs
2 ripe bananas
100 grams porridge oats for gluten intolerance or coeliac use certified coeliac oats or free from oats
100 grams self raising flour for coeliacs or gluten intolerance use Gluten free flour

Method
1, Preheat oven 190 or Gas 5.
Muffin tins put paper cases in bake for 20 minutes alternatively line a baking tray but bake for 40 minutes.

2, Cream the butter/margarine and sugar together, using a wooden spoon or electric whisk.

3, Add syrup, vanilla extract, eggs and cinnamon and mix well.

4, Add oats either blend in a food mixture or using electric whisk to blend down as whisked for a couple of minutes.

5, Add banana, if mixing by hand then mash first, if not add and use electric whisk to blend until the mixture is smooth.

6, Add flour, mix gradually with a large spoon until folded. Using a spoon, spoon the mixture into the cases half filling once each tray is complete place in oven, set timer.

7, Check after 20 minutes for muffins or 40 for a larger cake, prick centre with a cake skewer or similar.

8, Once cooked remove from oven place on a cooling rack to cool.

9, Buttercream or Cream cheese Icing can be added or a simply a sprinkling of cinnamon and sugar shaken over the top for added taste and texture.

Tru3 J0y
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Quinoa recipes

Quinoa seed crackers

3 tablespoons flaxseeds,
3 tablespoons sunflower seeds
2 tablespoons sesame seeds
3 ounces (1/2 cup packed) cooked quinoa
2 ounces (1/2 cup, minus 1 tablespoons) quinoa flour (or, substitute 2 ounces superfine brown rice flour)
2 ounces (1/2 cup, plus 1 tablespoon) quinoa flakes
3 ounces (1/2 cup) potato starch
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon xanthan gum
1/2 teaspoon guar gum
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 ounces butter, softened
2 ounces olive oil
2 to 5 tablespoons ice-cold water

Method
Preparing to make the crackers Preheat the oven to 400°. Pull out a sheet tray and line it with a sheet of parchment paper.
Preparing the seeds. Put the flaxseed, sesame seeds and sunflower seeds, into the food processor. Pulse it until they have broken down but not butter.
Mixing in the dry ingredients. Add the cooked quinoa, quinoa flour, quinoa flakes, potato starch, baking powder, xanthan gum, guar gum, and salt to the food processor. Let it run for a couple of minutes, so everything has a chance to mix and dance, and the flours to become blended well.
Finishing the dough. Add the softened butter to the mix. Spin the food processor around. Slowly, drizzle in the oil, with the food processor running. At this point, the dough should be clumping together quite well, but not yet one big ball. If the dough feels at all too dry, add the water, 1 tablespoon at a time. Turn off the food processor.
Rolling out the dough. Put the clumps of dough onto the baking sheet. Squidge the dough together into a vague lump and carefully, gently, roll it out the approximate length and width of the baking sheet. If you desire, top the crackers with additional sesame seeds.
Baking the crackers. Bake the crackers until they are browned and firm to the touch, but not too brown or firm to the touch, about 20 minutes in our oven. Take them out of the oven and let them cool on the baking sheet.
Transfer the cracker (which should be one big sheet, or at least several) to a cutting board. When the cracker has completely cooled, cut it into the size of cracker you want. And so the cracker becomes crackers.

Makes about 20 crackers
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Quinoa recipes

Quinoa salad

200g/7oz quinoa, cooked according to the packet instructions
handful fresh parsley, chopped
1 tbsp chopped fresh mint
1 red pepper, finely diced
1 cucumber, finely diced
1 red onion, finely diced
100ml/3½fl oz extra virgin olive oil
1 lemon, juice only
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method
Mix together the quinoa, herbs, vegetables in a bowl; dress with olive oil and lemon juice, season, to taste, with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Vegetarian Spicy Quinoa pepper and bean stew

Prep Time: 10 min
Cooking Time: 20 min
Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:
2 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
1 onion, chopped
Pinch salt to taste
Freshly ground peppercorns
2 clove(s) garlic, chopped
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 tsp chilli flakes, or to taste
10 fresh diced tomatoes, without skin or a 450g tinned tomatoes
450g tin black beans
1 red pepper, chopped
1 yellow pepper, chopped
1 orange or green pepper, chopped
Sprigs of fresh herbs chopped marjoram, oregano and tthyme or 1/2 tsp of dried herbs
1 Litre of vegetable stock
1 cup of cooked quinoa
Optional extra’s:
1 small tin of sweet corn
6 mushrooms sliced
1 small courgette chopped

Method
In a large deep flat pan heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the chopped onion, stir until soft. Add, red bell pepper, cook until tender. Add the chili flakes tomatoes, herbs, black beans, and vegetable stock. Simmer, partially covered and stirring, 15 minutes. Add garlic, sweet corn, courgette, mushroom, peppers, or any other ingredients you choose, cook and cover for 3 minutes. Stir in quinoa and season with salt and fresh pepper to taste.

Serve, top with:
• fresh herbs to taste
• fresh grated Cheddar or cheese of choice

Tru3 J0y
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Rosemary socca Gluten free bread

~ Rosemary socca bread ~

~ Gluten free Chickpea/Gram flour ~

~ originates from Nice, French Riviera & Genoa, Italian Riviera ~

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English: Socca, just coming out of the oven an...

English: Socca, just coming out of the oven and served hot, in the old town of Nice (Vieux-Nice), on the French Riviera (Alpes-Maritimes, France). Français : Socca sortant tout juste du four et servie chaude, dans le Vieux-Nice (Alpes-Maritimes, France). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 Socca is an uncomplicated traditional delicious bread peppery-hot, with a gorgeous rosemary smell and flavour.

Traditionally baked in a wood-burning oven using a copper pan, and now very hot oven at home.

Gluten free therefore ideal substitute for cereal and grain based breads.

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~ Preparation time ~ 10 minutes

~ Cooking time ~ 9 – 11 minute

~ Serves  ~ 6 – 8
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~ Ingredients :

450 grams/ 1lb Chickpea or gram flour now available in most supermarkets, health food, Indian and Middle Eastern
shops
600 ml warm water
150 ml virgin olive oildivided into two cups with 75 ml each
large handful of washed and dry fresh rosemary leaves or optional variations below the recipe
1 teaspoon baking powder – optional not traditional bread is lighter with it
1 teaspoon freshly ground rock salt
2 teaspoons freshly ground mixed peppercorns

~ Equipment:

  • Large mixing bowl
  • Oven proof dish to prove and bake in
  • Whisk
  • Pastry brush
  • Metal spoon
  • Teaspoons
  • Measuring jug
  • Two cups
  • 50 cm round stone dish or similar

~ Method to make the Chickpea batter:

  1. Sift the chickpea flour into a large mixing bowl.
  2. Adding the pepper, salt, baking powder.
  3. Make a well in the middle slowly pouring in the water – whisking constantly to eliminate lumps.
  4. Then slowly stir in half the olive oil mixing in thoroughly until the dough is runny.
  5. Add the rosemary or any other additional ingredients
  6. Cover with cloth and leave in a warm place overnight or set aside while the oven warms – if you do not have time or patience!

 

~ To bake:

  1. Preheat oven to very hot 240C or 470F or Gas mark 9.
  2. Heat a dry, round 50cm (20 inch) stone dish, or equivalent, for about 5 minutes.
  3. Remove to brush oil evenly over the hot dish.
  4. Pour in the batter, spread thinly.
  5. Place straight in oven while dish is hot.
  6. Bake for 8-10 minutes until bread is firm and starting to brown.
  7. Remove the socca bread from the oven.
  8. Brush top lightly with olive oil.
  9. Place under a hot grill until the top turns a golden with brown tips.
  10. Slice into wedges and serve hot.

~ Variations to add into the batter:

  • finely chopped onion
  • sun dried tomatoes
  • capsicum
  • chopped black olives
  • Substitute fresh rosemary for fresh thyme, oregano or basil.

~ Variations to serve:

Salad  ~ Boiled egg, fish, olives, tomatoes,  spicy salad leaves

Buffet ~ Serve with dips, anti-pasti, cold meats

Pizza base ~  add preferred toppings  such as tomatoes, olives, cold meats, halloumi, feta or ricotta cheese, thinly sliced vegetables such as artichokes, seafood and herbs.

Autumnal A’s Pumpkin soup: https://sharonac72.wordpress.com/2012/08/25/as-simple-autumnal-pumpkin-soup/

Graham’s 30 minute Chicken and vegetable stew

Chicken and vegetable stew – Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 2 dessert spoons of sunflower or olive oil
  • 6 pieces of Chicken breast – cut into large 2″ chunks
  • 1 onion – finely chopped
  • 1 carrot per person – peeled and chopped
  • Add other vegetables of choice – cabbage, peppers sliced; peas, sweetcorn
  • 1 dessert spoon of cajun spices
  • 2 dessert spoons of bouillion
  • 1 1/2 Litres of boiling water
  •  1 dessert spoon of cornflour
  • 600 grams of rice
  • freshly ground mixed peppercorns

Method

  1. Add and heat the oil in a large stockpot or saucepan for half a minute on a medium heat until oil heated.
  2. Add cajun, chopped onion saute in a medium heat for one minute; maximum.
  3. Add chicken brown off adding vegetables of choice mixing thoroughly together to ensure spices well spread out; heat together for five minutes.
  4. Put bouillion or stock cubes to boiling water dissolving well before adding to the saucepan – mixing well with other ingredients once you do.
  5. Simmer for twenty minutes – check the chicken is cooked before serving.
  6. Once chicken is simmering cook the rice adding to pan and then double water to amount of rice simmering on a low heat for fifteen minutes.
  7. Add cornflour to a little cold water about 50ml eggcup amount – mix until smooth watery paste add to saucpean gently mix well heat to boil for two mintues to ensure flavours are blended together and cooked in.
  8. Serve with the rice adding freshly ground mixed peppercorns, to taste.

 

Dairy and Gluten free Banana and walnut cake

Dairy and Gluten free Banana and walnut cake

Ingredients:

150 grams dairy free spread

150 grams sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla essence

2 eggs

800 grams mashed bananas

400 grams of gluten free self-raising flour

1 teaspoon mixed spice or cinnamon

60 grams broken Walnuts (if preferred)

Method

Turn on oven to Gas mark 4 or 180 degrees Celsius. Line a 8″ diameter round or square deep cake tin.

Add spread and sugar to a bowl and cream using an electric whisk – adding vanilla essence and eggs.

Add mashed bananas, walnuts and mixed spice or cinnamon mix thoroughly.

Using a metal spoon fold in the flour.

Once thoroughly but gently folded pour into the tin and bake for 1 hour.

Using a skewer check it is cooked once cooked place on a cooling rack until cool then remove from the tin.

Adaptations:

  • using two types of gluten free flour adds variety and changes the flavour abd texture
  • use dessiccated cocunut instead of walnuts
  • use dates chopped instead of walnuts

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Herbs & spices aid digestion – a happier inside out life!

Herbs and spices to aid digestion

Peppermint tea

Peppermint tea (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To prevent painful cramps and sharp pains after eating food,

I have found that drinking peppermint tea aids digestion

(thanks to my parents recommendation).

Other teas which aid digestion include:

Peppermint tea is a natural anti-spasmodic which means that it slows the muscles in the bowel which in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) may contract to frequently adding to the pains felt in the intestines also easing flatulence caused by either too much insoluble fibre, drinking fizzy drinks too fast or air taking in whilst eating too quickly.

Camomile tea also helps to ease digestion and has calming soothing properties so easing nerves reducing anxiety – not related to digestion, camomile teabags can be infused cooled and applied to soothe itchy inflames eyes and is added to creams to soothe rashes and sensitive skin for nursing mothers or their babies.

Nettleleaf tea is used to relieve nettle rash, allergic reactions and hayfever whilst also being high in vitamins and minerals especially iron, which is important for girls and women.

 

 

Fennel seed

Fennel seed (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Fennel seed tea is used to aid digestion relieve bloating and nausea whilst also for breastfeeding mothers it is said to increase menstruation, milk flow and reduce colic and wind in the baby (found in many curry spices).

Traditionally we have added herbs and spices when cooking, each has a role to play and not just for taste but digestive health and comfort. Herbs and spices to aid digestion include; bay, caraway, cardamom, chervil, cumin, cinnamon, dill, ginger, mint, tarragon – so there is a reason why we serve mint sauce with lamb!

Detox – Cleanse inside out!

We all need to cleanse the inside of our bodies just as we cleanse the outside! So my first recipe is a Detox soup!

Detox  – Potassium broth

Ingredients:

2 large potatoes chopped into large chunks

2 large carrots chopped into large chunks

1 cup of red beetroot chopped into chunks

4 celery sticks, chopped into small chunks

1 cup of parsley roughly chopped

1 cup of turnips chopped into chunks

1 cup of peeled and diced red onion

Pinch of cayenne pepper to taste.

Method:

  1. Using a 1.8L (Litres) or 13 1/2P (pints).
  2. Place all ingredients into the stockpot .
  3. Bring to the boil for five minutessimmer for two hours, then strain.
  4. Drink hot reheat as required bringing to the boil.

 

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