Banana Berry Smoothie

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Serves 2 (or halved for 1)

Ingredients

2 ripe bananas
400 grams of berries
Berries of your choice either one type or a variety (whatever takes your fancy) blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, mulberries, cranberries, loganberries

200 ml almond milk (or another dairy free milk of choice)

2 tablespoons of honey, agave (or maple syrup or another of your choice)

2 tablespoons of linseeds

Method

Put all ingredients carefully into a blender and blend thoroughly, add crushed ice, if preferred especially on warmer days.

Serve chilled and immediately in tall glasses.

Tru3 J0y

Posted from WordPress

Banana detox smoothie ~ burns fat!?

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Ingredients

◾1 banana
◾1 orange or kiwi
◾1 cup of dairy-free or low-fat yogurt
◾1 tablespoon coconut oil
◾¼ tablespoon ginger powder
◾2 tablespoons flax seeds/linseeds

Method

Mix all the ingredients in a blender. Drink immediately!

FODMAP DIET

Fermentable

Oligo-saccharides

Di- accharides

Mono-saccharides

And

Polyols

 

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A diet low in FODMAP’s may be of benefit to some IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) sufferers as it removes or alleviates symptoms of bloating, wind, abdominal pain with alternating bowel habits between constipation and diarrhoea with or without nausea and vomiting, but not all! Neither will it remove other physiological symptoms such as skin conditions, joint pain and discomfort, headaches or migraines.

A diet high, FODMAP’s (fruits, dairy, vegetables and grain cereals) are a category of carbohydrates, which rapidly fermented in the gut/ intestine.

It is important when speaking with your GP that you ask to be referred to a registered dietician with FODMAP approach training.

The low FODMAP diet is complex and so it is advisable to speak with a dietician, and one who is registered and experienced with this specialist diet. This is important as it is all to easy to begin a diet but omit certain foods which subsequently will also mean that either we do not benefit fully or we miss out on essential vitamins and minerals, this can have a detrimental affect on our body through lack of nutrition. Without the appropriate knowledge of foods, ingredients, processed foods, labels and eating out we can easily read information wrongly as some ingredients are ‘hidden’ being called different names like E numbers. There is a lot of confusing advice, some research has become outdated, then there is new research, and it is all too easy to read information on the internet to follow it to our detriment or even peril. It can also become ineffective.

The FODMAP diet is relatively new, so it is possible that a GP or gastroenterologist does not know if this diet, ask for them to refer you to a registered dietician to receive the correct up-to-date information. There are FODMAP trained dieticians working in the NHS and privately both may require referrals from your GP or consultant private dieticians may also require a referral. A vast amount of research and training is being undertaken a growing number of registered dieticians who are skilled in the delivery of the low FODMAP diet with formal training at a variety of global institutions.

High FODMAP

Vegetables and Legumes

  • Garlic – avoid entirely if possible
  • Onions – avoid entirely if possible
  • Artichoke
  • Asparagus
  • Baked beans
  • Beetroot
  • Black eyed peas
  • Broad beans
  • Butter beans
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery – greater than 5cm of stalk
  • Kidney beans
  • Leeks
  • Mange Tout
  • Mushrooms
  • Peas
  • Savoy Cabbage
  • Soy beans
  • Split peas
  • Scallions / spring onions (bulb / white part)
  • Shallots

Fruit – fruits can contain high fructose

  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Avocado
  • Blackberries
  • Cherries
  • Currants
  • Dates
  • Feijoa
  • Figs
  • Grapefruit
  • Lychee
  • Mango
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Persimmon
  • Plums
  • Pomegranate
  • Prunes
  • Raisins
  • Tinned fruit in apple / pear juice
  • Watermelon

Meats, Poultry and Meat Substitutes

  • Chorizo
  • Sausages
  • Processed meat – check ingredients

Cereals, Grains, Breads, Biscuits, Pasta, Nuts and Cakes

  • Wheat containing products such (be sure to check labels):
  • Biscuits
  • Breadcrumbs
  • Cashews
  • Cakes
  • Croissants
  • Crumpets
  • Egg noodles
  • Muffins
  • Regular noodles
  • Pastries
  • Pasta made from wheat
  • Sourdough
  • Udon noodles
  • Wheat bread
  • Wheat cereals
  • Wheat flour
  • Wheat rolls
  • Wheatgerm
  • Barley
  • Bran cereals
  • Couscous
  • Gnocchi
  • Muesli
  • Pistachios
  • Rye
  • Semolina

Condiments, Sweets, Sweeteners and Spreads

  • Agavae
  • Fructose
  • Gravy, if it contains onion
  • High fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
  • Honey
  • Milk chocolate
  • Relish
  • Stock cubes
  • Sugar free sweets containing polyols – usually ending in -ol or isomalt
  • Inulin
  • Isomalt
  • Maltitol
  • Mannitol
  • Sorbitol
  • Xylitol

Prebiotic Foods

  • The follow items can be added to yoghurts, snack bars etc:
  • FOS – fructooligosaccharides
  • Inulin
  • Oligofructose

Drinks

  • Beer – if drinking more than one bottle
  • Dandelion tea
  • Fruit and herbal teas with apple added
  • Fruit juices in large quantities
  • Fruit juices made of apple, pear, mango
  • Orange juice in quantities over 100ml
  • Rum
  • Sodas containing High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
  • Soy milk made with soy beans – commonly found in USA
  • Sports drinks
  • Tea, fennel
  • Tea, chamomile
  • Tea, oolong
  • Wine – if drinking more than one glass

Dairy Foods

  • Buttermilk
  • Cream cheese
  • Cream
  • Custard
  • Ice cream
  • Milk – cow, goat and sheep
  • Sour cream
  • Yoghurt – including greek yogurt

LOW FODMAP

egetables and Legumes

  • Alfalfa
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Bok choy / pak choi
  • Broccoli – avoid large servings
  • Brussel sprouts – 1 serving of 2 sprouts
  • Butternut squash – 1/4 cup
  • Cabbage – 1 serving of 1 cup
  • Carrots
  • Celery – less than 5cm of stalk
  • Collard greens
  • Corn / sweet corn- if tolerable and only in small amounts – 1/2 cob
  • Courgette
  • Chick peas – 1/4 cup
  • Chilli – if tolerable
  • Chives
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant / aubergine
  • Fennel
  • Green beans
  • Green pepper (green bell pepper)
  • Ginger
  • Kale
  • Leek leaves
  • Lentils – in small amounts
  • Lettuce
  • Marrow
  • Okra
  • Olives
  • Parsnip
  • Radish
  • Red peppers (red bell pepper)
  • Potato
  • Pumpkin
  • Pumpkin, canned – 1/4 cup, 2.2 oz
  • Scallions / spring onions (green part)
  • Silverbeet / chard
  • Spaghetti squash
  • Spinach, baby
  • Squash
  • Swede
  • Sweet potato – 1/2 cup
  • Tomato – avoid cherry tomato
  • Turnip
  • Yam
  • Zucchini

Fruit

  • Bananas
  • Blueberries
  • Boysenberry
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cranberry
  • Clementine
  • Dragonfruit
  • Grapes
  • Honeydew and Galia melons
  • Kiwifruit
  • Lemon including lemon juice
  • Lime
  • Mandarin
  • Orange
  • Passion fruit
  • Paw paw
  • Papaya
  • Pineapple
  • Raspberry
  • Rhubarb
  • Strawberry
  • Tangelo

Meats, Poultry and Meat Substitutes

  • Chicken
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Prosciutto
  • Quorn, mince
  • Turkey
  • Cold cuts / deli meat / cold meats such as ham and turkey breast

Fish and Seafood

  • Canned tuna
  • Fresh fish e.g.
    • Salmon
    • Cod
    • Haddock
    • Plaice
    • Trout
  • Seafood (ensuring nothing else is added) e.g.
    • Crab
    • Lobster
    • Shrimp
    • Mussels
    • Oysters

Cereals, Grains, Breads, Biscuits, Pasta, Nuts and Cakes

  • Wheat free or gluten free breads
  • Bread made from oats, rice, corn, and potato flours
  • Wheat free or gluten free pasta
  • Buckwheat noodles
  • Rice noodles
  • Porridge and oat based cereals
  • Cornflakes – 1/2 cup
  • Rice bran
  • Rice Krispies
  • Almonds – max of 15
  • Amaranth
  • Brazil nuts
  • Bulgur / bourghal – 1/4 cup cooked, 44g serving
  • Buckwheat
  • Buckwheat flour
  • Brown rice / whole grain rice
  • Cornflour / maize
  • Crispbread
  • Corncakes
  • Coconut – milk, cream, flesh
  • Corn tortillas, 3 tortillas
  • Hazelnuts – max of 15
  • Macadamia – max of 10
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Oatcakes
  • Peanuts
  • Pecans – max of 15
  • Pine nuts – max of 15
  • Polenta
  • Popcorn
  • Potato chips, plain
  • Potato flour
  • Pumpkin seeds – max of 1 – 2 tbsp
  • Quinoa
  • Rice cakes
  • Rice crackers
  • Rice flour
  • Sesame seeds – max of 1 – 2 tbsp
  • Spelt
  • Sunflower seeds – max of 1 – 2 tbsp
  • Sorgum
  • Tortilla chips
  • Walnuts – max of 10
  • White rice

Condiments, Sweets, Sweeteners and Spreads

  • Aspartame
  • Acesulfame K
  • Barbecue sauce
  • Chocolate, dark
  • Chutney, 1 tablespoon
  • Fish sauce
  • Garlic infused oil
  • Golden syrup
  • Glucose
  • Jam / jelly, strawberry
  • Ketchup (USA) – 1 sachet
  • Maple syrup
  • Marmalade
  • Mayonnaise – ensuring no garlic or onion in ingredients
  • Mustard
  • Olive oil
  • Oyster sauce
  • Pesto sauce – less than 1 tbsp
  • Peanut butter
  • Saccharine
  • Soy sauce
  • Stevia
  • Sweet and sour sauce
  • Sucralose
  • Sugar – also called sucrose
  • Tomato sauce (outside USA) – 2 sachets, 13g
  • Vegemite
  • Vinegar, balsamic – less than 2 tbsp
  • Vinegar, rice wine
  • Worcestershire sauce

Drinks

  • Alcohol – is an irritant to the gut, limited intake advised:
  • Beer – limited to one drink
  • Clear spirits such as Vodka
  • Gin
  • Whiskey
  • Wine – limited to one drink
  • Coffee, espresso, regular or decaffeinated, black
  • Coffee, espresso, regular or decaffeinated, with up to 250ml lactose free milk
  • Coffee, instant, regular or decaffeinated, black
  • Coffee, instant, regular or decaffeinated, with up to 250ml lactose free milk
  • Espresso, regular, black
  • Fruit juice, 125ml and safe fruits only
  • Lemonade – in low quantities
  • Soya milk made with soy protein
  • Sugar free fizzy drinks / soft drinks / soda – such as diet coke, in low quantities as aspartame and acesulfame k can be irritants
  • ‘Sugar’ fizzy drinks / soft drinks / soda that do no contain HFCS such as lemonade, cola. Limit intake due to these drinks being generally unhealthy and can cause gut irritation
  • Tea, black, weak e.g. PG Tips
  • Tea, chai, weak
  • Tea, fruit and herbal, weak – ensure no apple added
  • Tea, green
  • Tea, peppermint
  • Tea, white
  • Water

Dairy Foods and Eggs

  • Butter
  • Cheese, brie
  • Cheese, camembert
  • Cheese, cheddar
  • Cheese, cottage
  • Cheese, feta
  • Cheese, goat / chevre
  • Cheese, mozzarella
  • Cheese, ricotta – 2 tablespoons
  • Cheese, swiss
  • Dairy free chocolate pudding
  • Eggs
  • Gelato
  • Lactose free milk
  • Lactose free yoghurt
  • Margarine
  • Oat milk
  • Parmesan cheese
  • Rice milk
  • Sorbet
  • Soy protein (avoid soya beans)
  • Swiss cheese
  • Tempeh
  • Tofu
  • Whipped cream

Cooking ingredients, Herbs and Spices

  • Herbs: Basil, Cilantro, Coriander, Mint, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Tarragon, Thyme
  • Spices: All spice, Cinnamon, Cumin, Five spice, Paprika, Turmeric
  • Baking powder
  • Baking soda
  • Cocoa powder
  • Cream, 1/2 cup
  • Gelatine
  • Ghee
  • Icing sugar
  • Lard
  • Salt
  • Vegetable oil

What is a food allergy or intolerance?

A food allergy is sometimes used to describe all adverse reactions to food, the term is more often used to refer specifically to food reactions that are mediated by the immune system.

To protect us from illness and disease, our immune systems protect us from illnesses and diseases so  are continuously trying to lessen the danger represented by substances called antigens. Antigens are parts of proteins that our bodies recognize as dangerous and take steps to neutralize. Antigens can be found most anywhere there is protein – in foods, of course, but also in microorganisms like bacteria.

When our immune cells identify a dangerous antigen, they act to neutralize it and prevent it from causing harm in the body. When antigens from bacteria or viruses interact with our cells, we can get the flu, or the common cold. We don’t get the flu from food antigens, but we can get a wide range of immune-related symptoms that range from sniffles to hives to anaphylactic shock.

Immediate versus Delayed Hypersensitivity

Allergic reactions to food, also called food hypersensitivities, are further classified as either immediate or delayed. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions occur within hours or even a few minutes after a food is eaten, typically causing very obvious physical symptoms such as a rash, the hives, a running nose, or a headache.

In rare cases, immediate hypersensitivity reactions can cause anaphylactic shock, a life-threatening condition in which the throat swells and blocks the passage of air. Immediate hypersensitivities affect only a small percentage of the population.

Immediate Reactions to Food

The foods that are most often implicated as the cause of immediate allergic responses include milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (walnuts), soy, strawberries, wheat, fish and shellfish. Many people with immediate food hypersensitivities must completely eliminate the offending food from their diet to avoid the serious symptoms.

Delayed Reactions to Food

Many of the same foods that are known to cause immediate hypersensitivities in a small number of people, have been implicated as a cause of delayed or “masked” food allergies in much larger numbers of individuals. Delayed food hypersensitivity reactions are believed to affect millions of people; some physicians have suggested that as many as 60% of all Americans suffer from masked food allergies.

These reactions may be responsible for a variety of symptoms including dark circles or puffiness under the eyes, fluid retention, dermatitis, sinus congestion, fatigue, abdominal pain or discomfort, joint inflammation, mood swings, indigestion, headaches, chronic ear infections, asthma, poor memory, anxiety and depression.

As the name suggests, delayed hypersensitivities do not appear immediately after consuming a particular food. In fact, in most cases the immune response is so delayed that it is difficult to determine which food is causing the symptoms, and many people are unaware that they are sensitive to certain foods.

Only through careful dietary manipulation, such as an Elimination Diet or Rotation Diet, is it usually possible to identify these hidden food allergies. The foods most often associated with delayed hypersensitivities include dairy products, eggs, wheat, soy products, peanuts, shellfish, and refined sugar.

Food Intolerance are immune-mediated food allergies represent one type of adverse food reaction. Another type of adverse food reaction is called food intolerance. Food intolerance is an umbrella term that refers to any abnormal physiological response to a food that is not caused by an antibody/antigen reaction. For example, some food intolerances are caused by enzyme deficiencies, while others are caused by poor function of the digestive tract or a sensitivity to a natural or synthetic chemical.

Lactose Intolerance is the most common food intolerance, which affects as many as 30% of adults, additionally it is particularly common in people of African and Asian heritage.

People with lactose intolerance do not produce enough of the digestive enzyme called lactase, which breaks down the milk sugar (lactose) found in dairy products. When too much undigested lactose makes its way into the large intestine, people suffer from gas and/or diarrhoea.

Wheat intolerance,  wheat allergy, and wheat sensitivity are all terms frequently used to described adverse reaction to this food. Wheat is unique when it comes to adverse food reactions, particularly because it has long been classified as the primary “gluten grain” and because its research history has been both complicated and controversial. Understanding allergy-related issues associated with gluten is important for understanding problems connected to wheat.

 

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Go Bananas!

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Wrapped up inside like a present hidden beneath the wrapping peel are excellent nutrients.

Potassium for:
• optimal brain,
• cardiac,
• muscle function.

Manganese for:
• healthy bones,
• tissues,
• blood pressure.

A non-irritant to the gastro intestinal tract due to high dietary fibre.

Bananas are often included as part of a diet called BRAT (Bananas, Rice, Apples, Toast) for people with gastro intestinal problems.

Full of Vitamins:
• B6,
• C,
• other antioxidants for a healthy immune system.

Carbohydrates for
• pre-exercise fueling
• post-exercise fueling.

Tru3 J0y

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Apple, Banana spice breakfast muffins

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Ingredients
1 Cooking apple, peel, core and dice
3 tablespoons of cold water
150g plus 2 tablespoons of brown gluten free flour
150g gluten free oats
2 bananas mashed
100g raisins or other small or chopped dried fruit
2 teaspoons of baking powder
2 teaspoons of cinnamon
1 teaspoon of mixed spice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 medium eggs beaten
125 ml of dairy free yogurt or 100 ml dairy milk alternative
220 ml maple syrup
1 dessert eating apple peel, core and dice

Method

Preheat oven to 180 C/ Gas mark 4/ 350 F.

Line 18 holes of muffin tins.

Put cooking apple and water in a small saucepan bring to boil then simmer until soft. Mash with a fork and then leave aside to cool.

In a large bowl add the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly. Add the eggs, yogurt, cooked apple, diced apples, and maple syrup and mix gently together.

Spoon the mixture equally into the cases.

Bake for 25-30 minutes depending on if you have a fan assisted oven or longer if not. Insert a cake skewer to check muffins are cooked in the centre.

Serve hot with dairy free yogurt or cool and eat cold a great breakfast or snack when you’re on the go!

Bon appétit!

Tru3 J0y

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Coffee and banana cake

Ingredients
4 ripe mashed bananas,
1 1/2 cups self-raising flour
1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup caster sugar
2 beaten eggs
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 tablespoons milk or milk alternative
1 tablespoon espresso or strong instant coffee
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
1 cup chopped raw walnuts or dried dates

Method

1. Preheat the oven Gas mark 4/350ºF/180ºC. Line a 20cm cake tin either round or square with greaseproof or baking paper.

2. In a large bowl, with an electric mixer beat the butter and sugar together until light and creamy.

3. Add in eggs, mix until combined.

4. Add the mashed bananas, milk, espresso, baking soda and vanilla stirring well until combined.

5. Fold in flour. Stir until just combined and the mixture is almost smooth.

6. Lastly, stir in walnuts or dried dates chopped.

7. Pour the mixture into a greased and floured tin and bake for 45-50 minutes or until a wooden pick comes out clean, if cake is burning or too brown cover with greaseproof paper and continue to bake.

8. Allow to cool before removing the cake from the tin.

Tru3 J0y

Posted from WordPress

Cinnamon Banana Sponge cake

Cinnamon Banana Sponge cake

150 grams dairy free spread
150 grams sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
2 eggs, beaten
800 grams mashed bananas
400 grams of gluten free Flour
1 teaspoon mixed spice or cinnamon
60 grams broken Walnuts (if preferred)
Method
Turn on oven to Gas Mark 4 or 180 Celsius
Line a 8″ diameter round or square deep cake tin.
Add spread and sugar to a bowl and cream using an electric whisk – adding vanilla essence and eggs.
Add mashed bananas, walnuts and mixed spice or cinnamon mix thoroughly.
Using a metal spoon fold in the flour. Once thoroughly but gently folded pour into the tin and bake for 1 hour.
Using a skewer check it is cooked once cooked place on a cooling rack until cool then remove from the tin.

Adaptations:
using two types of gluten free flour adds variety and changes the flavour and texture.  
Swap the walnuts for another nut
Swap the walnuts for dates to be nut free

                                      ******************

Carrot, banana and lemon cake ~ Gluten free, Dairy free, Vegan

I need to make a cake, well no, actually, truth is, I need to use up a few ripe bananas!
I don’t have nuts and I fancy a change from the usual banana cake/bread/muffins recipes.
Muffins… that makes me remember making, (years ago) banana and carrot muffins.
However, I am trying to recall vaguely the proportions in order to make a suitable recipe whilst using up my bananas and other store cupboard ingredients without having to buy too many if any extra’s! I will add photographs once completed the process, hopefully it will be delicious! I know my eldest son, (who isn’t free from anything or vegan), will want a Philadelphia cream cheese, vanilla extract and icing sugar to make the icing! For those of us who wish for suitable healthier decorations then may I suggest one to suit your tastes. Please don’t be offended if it is not your choice):
Naked
Honey drizzle
Maple syrup drizzle
Butters – nut, dairy free, coconut oil
Alternative spreads
(This proves you shouldn’t multi-task or ‘burn the candle at both ends’ – “Eventually my neighbour was able to let in!” #Random ?)
Please adapt the recipe to suit you, as long as the basic elements are followed then you can’t really go wrong!
Ingredients:
• 3 tbsp.’s honey, raw maple, agave, or fruit syrup (honey)
• 3 tbsp.’s of mild olive oil
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract/essence
• 3 mashed organic ripe bananas
• 1 large grated carrot
• 1 lemon freshly squeezed lemon juice and zest
• 3 tbsp.’s gluten free plain flour
•2 tsps baking powder
•½ tsp of baking soda
• 1 teaspoons xanthan gum
• a handful of either chopped dried apricots/dates/prunes
• a handful of chopped raw walnuts or pecans (optional) save some to decorate
Method:
Preheat oven to Gas mark 4, Electric 180 degrees Celsius.
Grease an line three sandwich cake tins 7″diameter.
Beat the syrup, oil, vanilla, and salt.
Add the bananas, carrot, lemon juice, and zest.
Mix with the flour, baking powder, and baking soda into the banana mixture.
Fold in the nuts and apricots.
Spoon into the tins, bake for about 20-25 min, or until cake skewer comes out clean.
Leave it cool, before removing from pan.
Decorate!

Tru3 J0y

Posted from WordPress

Cake for one!

A really easy cake for one, despite being sacrilege if microwaved, although it can be baked in the oven.

Ingredients:
3 tbsp flour either white or 1 tbsp Gluten free plain flour or ground almonds
1/4 tsp baking powder
Pinch of salt
1 tbsp Demerara or golden granulated sugar
1 tablespoon water
2 tsp water
2 tsp of either oil, melted margarine or applesauce
1/4 tsp pure vanilla extract

Choose a variation of your choice:

Cinnamon and pecan:
A pinch of cinnamon (choose to suit your taste)
2 pecan halves
1 heaped tsp Demerara or golden granulated sugar
1/2 tsp of either oil, melted margarine, mashed banana or applesauce the latter two for a fat-free version if desired
tiny pinch salt

Coffee and Walnut:
1/2 tsp of dissolved expresso or strong coffee solution
2 walnut halves
1 heaped tsp Demerara or golden granulated sugar
1/2 tsp of either oil, melted margarine, mashed banana or applesauce/pureed apple the latter two for a fat-free version if desired
tiny pinch salt

Chocolate:
1/4 tsp cocoa
3 crushed hazelnuts
1 heaped tsp Demerara or golden granulated sugar
1/2 tsp of either oil, melted margarine, mashed banana or applesauce the latter two for a fat-free version if desired
tiny pinch salt

Cherry and Macadamia
1-2 chopped cherries
2 crushed Macadamias
1 heaped tsp Demerara or golden granulated sugar
1/2 tsp of either oil, melted margarine, mashed banana or applesauce the latter two for a fat-free version if desired
tiny pinch salt

Method:
Preheat to 330 F.
Combine batter dry ingredients and mix well.
Add wet and mix until just mixed. In a tiny bowl, combine all
filling ingredients.
Fill a greased muffin tin or a ramekin or mug, if using the microwave 1/2 way with the batter.
Sprinkle on two-thirds of the filling, then spoon the remaining batter on top.
Finally, sprinkle on the rest of the filling.

Cook 12-13 minutes in the oven, or approximately 1 minute in a microwave.

N.B. Microwave times may vary depending on the wattage power of the microwave.

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Tru3 J0y
Posted from WordPress